Will Georgia move it’s 2012 primary up also?

In the shuffle coming up on this springs primary season…..

Several states have made noise about moving their primaries up…..

Add Georgia to the list…..

The 2012 primary calendar was designed in large part to prevent a 2008-style race to the front of the line, where a whole crush of states move their primaries early in the year to maximize their impact on the process. That’s why the RNC wants Florida to move its primary from Jan. 31 to after March 6, the first rule-sanctioned date when Florida could vote.

And as Georgia’s secretary of state showed today, there’s still the possibility of a calendar stampede if Florida gets to bend the rules:

[Secretary of State Brian] Kemp now has the power to name the date for Georgia’s presidential primary. He said he’s keeping a close eye on the South Carolina situation. If the Palmetto State gives up the honor of hosting the first deep South primary, Kemp would considering pushing Georgia into that spot…..

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5 Comments.

  1. Wouldn’t this benefit Romney as he continues to pile up more MILLIONS and I wonder if he’s pulling a Meg Whitman here, outspend your fellow GOPers from now to the GOP primaries next year and make sure they don’t gain any traction.

  2. Meg Whitman lost CD….Money and all….

  3. I know, but Romney will outspend his fellow GOPers to get the nomination…..and get beat by Obama in the general.

    However, what happens if Obama loses in 2012 and pulls a Grover Cleveland to win back the gig in 2016 ?

  4. Losing presidents don’t get renominated by their own parties, let alone (with the singular exception of Grover Cleveland who’d won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College in 1888) re-elected.

    Millard Fillmore didn’t get renominated by the Whigs in 1852, but after the Whigs had pretty well given way to the Republicans and the American (Know-Nothing) Party in 1856, they and the American Party both nominated Fillmore, who came in third with 22%.

    Martin Van Buren (unseated by Tippecanoe in 1840) ran again in 1848 for the Free Soil Party and won about 10%.

    Theodore Roosevelt declined to seek the 1908 Republican nomination (citing Washington’s two-term tradition), but ran again in 1912 for the Progressive (Bull Moose) Party, coming in second ahead of his successor Wm Howard Taft (R). Woodrow Wilson (D) won over 6 million votes, TR over 4 million (and a half-dozen states), Taft over 3 million (but only Utah and Vermont) and Eugene V. Debs (Socialist) over 900,000 (and no states).

  5. I have heard that Teddy Roosevelt would’ve been a shoo-in for the 1920 GOP nomination and election if he hadn’t inconveniently died in 1919.